Wednesday, December 11, 2013

INFREQUENT BLOGGER'S GUILT


Of all the forms of guilt, some of them perfectly legitimate, feeling guilty for not blogging often enough is possibly the most absurd. It demonstrates an inflated view of one's own importance and also, since the creation and upkeep of a blog is entirely self-determined, there are no rules dictating what the correct blogging frequency must be. Neverthless, guilt is what I feel and I am apologising, in a roundabout way, for a blogging blank of seventeen days. My excuse is having been otherwise engaged, busy with things which take priority over posting blogs and reading blogs. Of course everyone is always otherwise engaged yet it is such a joy when you, dear loyal readers, take the time to stop by here and leave some words, a signal that we are connecting, however briefly. Maybe my guilt is mainly a sense of neglecting friends, interrupting a cyber-flow of friendship. Perhaps that's an illusion or delusion but it's one worth nurturing. 


The private view at Café Rustique on December 1st was well attended and the small space cheefully filled, as you can see in the photo below, taken by the café owner on his phone. The low lighting and terra cotta coloured walls create an intimate ambiance which suits the pieces I'm showing but on normal working days, café customers are intently focused on their laptops and rarely look up at the walls. Still, I'm glad to see these works away from home.


 
Amidst the sadness at Mandela's departure, the thought struck me that he was one of three extraordinary men of our time who created tidal waves of positive transformation and inspiration which will not cease to transform and inspire future generations: Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King, Mahatma Gandhi. Is it a coincidence that these three men were not white? Perhaps a coincidence, perhaps a signpost that the only colour which truly matters in human relations is the incandescent light of truth and compassion, radiating from the heart and the conscience.

 
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19 comments:

Rain Trueax said...

Nice to see a new post and whether I always comment, I always notice. Looks good on your show :)

Tom said...

It seems to me that there is only one purpose in feeling guilt, and that is to address a subject that needs to be examined. Once that is done, guilt can be binned. Now I, for one, always look out for an incoming post or email from you. Just think of all the pleasure you have given us today with your latest post. Guilt expiated. :)

And now to be serious awhile. I think you may well be correct that the only colour that truly matters....is the incandescent light of truth and compassion, radiating from the heart and the conscience.

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Rain, and it always makes me happy to know that you have been here. Do you wear perfume? You leave behind a particular fragrance.

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Tom, I agree. Like pain, guilt is a signal that something needs examining, even if it's imaginary.
Just to hear that you look out for posts from me makes me want to communicate more often

Adam said...

A blogging blank - quelle horreur! We are always pleased to find a now post, dear N - a little lift of the heart.

"The low lighting and terra cotta coloured walls ..." - your works best seen in a low light? Your show looks lovely in the fine space.

Perhaps the three men of colour came from particularly oppressed backgrounds? I don't know enough to know if that is so.

Dominic Rivron said...

I wouldn't feel guilty - I think "slow blogging" is good for the blogosphere. I think "take time to post, take time to read, take time to comment" is a good philosophy.

Dominic Rivron said...

As for Mandela, I was very much struck by the poem "Invicta" by William Henley, which I didn't know and which he was fond of quoting.

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Adam,thanks. Glad to be an occasional heart-lifter.
Low light isn't really adequate for viewing artworks, but the general ambiance and coloured walls of the cafe make it a pleasant place to hang them all the same.
As for the three late great leaders, their biographies are readily found online and/or in books.

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Dominic, that's true but how slow can slow be stretched? I think I often overdo it.

The Henley poem is stirring, often quoted, and Mandela certainly lived every line nobly. I'm not so fond of it though, it's too much like Sinatra's "My Way", the bragadoccio of it.

Bruce Taylor, a.k.a. Catalyst said...

Natalie, how fine to read your words and see your show so delightfully displayed. I, too, have a "fear" of not blogging enough. Then there is the "fear" of blogging too much, mindlessly.

So..whatever you do, however you do it, your posts are blessed and greatly appreciated.

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Many thanks Bruce, and that's not just a cliché way of saying thank you. I like to think of Arizona skies and Arizona light coming in through this virtual window, via your presence.
As for blogging fears...feel the fear and do it anyway!

Ellena said...

I just lost my comment. One more time....
I read few blogs and each new post
is a gift to me. I don't count them, just appreciate them and feel guilty for not always taking the time to make a comment.
I do not feel guilty about not
posting.
We have a similar Café nearby.
Interesting art works to see and artists to be met.

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Dear Ellena, your comments must not be lost! If there's something I can do about the Blogger set-up to stop this happening, I'll do it. Thanks for persisting anyway, you are always so welcome here.

Lucy said...

I sympathise with your guilt, I frequently experience something similar, but in fact you've really been a very conscientious, creative, uplifting and friendly blogger for a very long time, as well as all the other awesome things you do, and for myself I'm simply pleased to see you as and when, be assured.

Expo looks grand!

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

That's really good to hear, Lucy, and modifies my self-image as the opposite of a conscientious blogger (whatever word fits that description). I'm simply pleased to see you too, whenever and wherever.

Hattie said...

That looks like such a nice occasion. It seems as if London combines the coziness of small town living with big city pleasures. I do envy that.

Dick said...

I'm past the guilt now, having lost all of the momentum that for years had me posting daily. My readership is down to a handful now and I'm in contact with nearly all of them personally or via Facebook. The rest is silence!

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Hattie, this cafe is indeed a cosy place, attracting mainly locals who spend hours there totally absorbed in their laptops. I don't know if they're writing the Great Novel or just twittering but they're certainly in another world.
Come and browse around London!

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

Dick, I know your blogging momentum has cooled down but as I hardly ever look at Facebook, I hope you'll rekindle your blog-fire some time.